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For words, French often produces hypocorisms either by truncating a word after the letter o, or by chopping off the end of the word and adding an o: Mc Do from Mc Donald's; gynéco from gynécologue; dico from dictionnaire; dodo (childish word for sleep, from dormir, to sleep); écolo from écologiste; coco from communiste; catho from catholique; psycho from psychologie.

The ending -oche (with or without an intervening consonant or phoneme to make it easier to pronounce) is also sometimes used: cinoche (cinéma), Mac Doche (Mc Donald's), fastoche (easy-peezy, from facile, easy).

The word "hypocorism" is the noun form in English; "hypocoristic" is the adjective form.

In French, for both male and female names, hypocorisms are most commonly formed by dropping the last syllable: A special case is the ending in -ick/ -ic, which is the French writing for the hypocoristic form in Breton "-ig", used for both genders. This diminutive, in its French form of "ick" or "ic", became in vogue for official names in the second half of the 20th century: In Breton, the diminutive form "...ig" can be given to any kind of names, nouns or adjectives, (un tammig, a few), while in French it relates only to given names. Often in Breton a hypocoristic form of a given name can be made by putting away the first syllable.Masculine names occasionally take an -a suffix, which is an archaic Slavic form In Portuguese, abbreviations of the name are common, such as suffixes for diminutive and augmentative.For males, the suffixes -inho (diminutive) and -ão (augmentative) are the most used.Words or names may also be shortened or abbreviated without an O: fixs from fixations, 'ski bindings'; Jean-Phi from Jean-Philippe; amphi from amphithéatre (large classroom or lecture hall); ciné (another informal word for cinéma).These words are familiar/informal versions of the underlying words.

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